Sunday, July 24, 2016

a league of their own

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I caught the Ghostbusters reboot last night, and like everyone I know, loved it. It's not a perfect movie (it's not terribly original, to be honest) but it made me laugh and it warmed my heart to see women being women and doing things and just being awesome friends and having adventures. The women in my circle of friends agreed it was great to see a movie with female friendship at its centre, and just a little sad that it's actually refreshing, rather than something we can count on.

It also reminded me of one of my favourite movies of all time - A League of Their Own.

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I caught this on HBO one random night last year, and spent a happy couple of hours enjoying every scene of a movie I loved as a kid. I'm a sucker for any kind of sports movie, so throw in a group of awesome tomboys trying to make a women's baseball league happen in an era where women belonged in the kitchen and a highly watchable cast (Geena Davis, Lori Petty, Rosie O'Donnell, Tom Hanks, Madonna) and you have a captive audience in me.

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Watching a movie I haven't watched in a while always brings some surprising revelations - in this case it was the fact that the movie also starred David Strathairn, looking Don Draper-handsome.

The other revelation was how great the costumes are - a look I can only describe as "lady-like scrappy". On one hand you had your women in standard 1940s garb, but on the other hand there was the odd baseball cap thrown into the mix, the dirt on their faces right next to their siren red lipstick, the flat-lace-ups shoes with the full skirts. It was still a traditional time for women but these were rule-breakers trying their best to get by. You have Geena Davis in a neat little suit, blouse and hat - and then she's off, sprinting alongside a train that's pulling out of the station, carrying two suitcases and tossing them onto the train, looking grimly determined. She's a heroine, but she didn't need a pair of trousers to prove it. The women wear floral tea dresses, satin slips and curl their hair, but there's a worn, dusty, undone look to everything, because they have other things to worry about.

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The movie doesn't overdo the "girl power" message as well, even though it was set in must have been a tremendous time for women, who had to move into the workplace with the men at war. One player has to bring her son on the road with her because there's no one to babysit, but the point isn't overplayed.

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I don't dislike movies about women dealing with relationships and romance (which is usually the case when a movie has a cast full of women) but it's just nice to see us defined in other ways, and in the case of Ghostbusters, having this "normalised" in a straightforward blockbuster. Here's to not having to wait decades to see another film about a group of women doing things.

Which are your favourite movies about women doing stuff?

Pix from here and here

Saturday, July 02, 2016

reverie

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Paris, April 2015

"I found myself walking like someone half asleep up the quai du Lourve, toward Chatelet and the big white Renaissance Revival Hotel de Ville. I walked until my feet hurt and I was soaked to the skin: past the Pont Neuf and the smooth round turrets of the Conciergerie and past the Michelin-starred restaurant that once had been a cheap brasserie. The urine-soaked odour of the metro wafted up through a sidewalk grate. The facades of the 18th century ile Saint-Louis looked luminous against the gray Parisian sky." -- "My Paris Dream", by Kate Betts

I recently finished reading "My Paris Dream", and when I got to this passage I felt such a strong sense of being understood. Whenever I make it to Paris, I find myself making at least one long walk across the arrondissements, letting myself fall into a Parisian reverie. This the the romance of Paris I never tire of - winding my way through the Left Bank and letting the sense of history and now collide and wash over me.

My love of Paris is not always understood, and in fact it amuses my friends that I am such a cliche - the Asian girl who loves Paris! I can only say that the city got me at the right age (when you are 21, is there anywhere else better to learn the ways of the sophisticated?), and having the chance to make multiple visits over the years and slowly getting to know the city has only made me love it more.

The Seine is my North Star. I like starting somewhere near the Grand Palais, crossing over to the Left and making my way down towards the ile Saint-Louis, making long, looping detours as I go, depending on my mood. If I'm rambling without purpose, I love the numerous art galleries and book stores of the area, or the stalls selling books and drawings along the river - I like buying old French magazines as keepsakes and once I found a French guidebook to Paris published in 1955, complete with a pullout map.

For the fashion-minded, you will find the amazing Dries Van Noten boutique, the Golden Goose store, and L/Uniform on the Quai Voltaire stretch alone. The Left Bank is also home to my favourite Parisian department store - Le Bon Marche - and of course once you reach the delightfully posh St Germain-de-Pres area, you'll find a good mix of the major names at a variety of price points, from Hermes to Muji.

For the food-minded, there is of course Poilane and Pierre Herme, and a never-ending parade of bakeries like L'eclair de Genie and others whose names I can't remember. Not far from Le Bon Marche you will find the beloved Mamie Gateaux, and if you are willing to make it far down enough to the Cimetiere du Montparnasse or Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, then I recommend grabbing dinner at La Cantine du Troquet, where the food, atmosphere and service are all excellent - you have to love restaurants where the staff don't mind explaining their all-French menu to you with patience.

The Left is also home to my favourite museum in Paris - the Musee Rodin. Apart from his unbelievable sculpture, the beautiful mansion that houses the museum is also dreamy to wander through, to say nothing of its gardens, which are perfect for picnics on good days. You can also see his drawings, as well as the works of the underrated Camille Claudel, which I love. The Eglise Saint Sulpice is of course also a draw for tourists, as is the wonderful Luxembourg Gardens, the perfect place to unwind after a day of tramping around the Left.

Any any point, it is possible to wind your way back to the Seine, and bear straight down to the ile de la Cite, and any of the bridges that traverse the river is a gorgeous place to watch the sunset, not to mention the people. You may also wish to make for Sainte Chapelle on ile de la Cite, the prettiest church I have ever seen.

A vast swathe of the Left Bank is dominated by the Sorbonne, which seems to add to the area's tradition and history, and slowed the tide of commercialism somewhat. Yes, there are chain stores and pricey boutiques, but you only need to cross the river to the Marais area to see what "commercialised" can really mean. The Left Bank isn't the haven it was for artists, writers and philosophers in an earlier era, but the romance remains, which isn't easy for such a storied district.

Yes we travel to open our eyes, but sometimes we also travel to dream. Paris, for all its changes, remains very much a dreamscape for me. I leave to a fellow Francophile (or shall I say, Parisophile) to say it best:

"Behind me, a breeze suckled the blinds from a large open window. The view spanned Paris, one of those views that came with sunshine and clarinets, from the Eiffel Tower to the Grand Palais, to the fondant of the Sacré Coeur.

I wanted to levitate right out of the room." -- "Paris I Love You, But You're Bringing Me Down", by Rosencrans Baldwin

Saturday, June 25, 2016

back to bkk

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As a child, visiting my father who was posted there several years for work, Bangkok was an assault on my sheltered senses - it was hotter, wetter, noisier, dustier and sprawled in a million directions. The language was wilder - complicated, and melodic and piercing at the same time. The food was spicier, sweeter and saltier. The temples were grand and mysterious. Even the cars, with their dark tinted windows - something we didn't have in Singapore - seemed exciting. Bangkok was intense. I loved it all.

Long after my father no longer worked there, Bangkok remained a mainstay as a holiday spot. For Singaporeans, Bangkok is a land of inexpensive thrills - shopping, food, and massages mainly - even with the strengthening baht over the years. The city, just two-odd hours away, is a popular option for a budget getaway, and you'd be hard pressed not to run into a Singaporean at any of the usual tourist hotspots.

As a university student I visited Bangkok regularly for the same reasons, and never tried too hard to explore any off-the-beaten-path spots - I ate street food on Yaowarat and near my budget hotel in Sukhumvit; I shopped and ate my way through Chatuchak (it never gets old), I became addicted to Thai massages at Healthland (also still good), I people-watched in Siam Square. Every now and I then I looked for a Wat or a food market I hadn't visited, or did a short trips to places like Ayutthaya, Bang Pa In, Kanchanaburi, and Hua Hin. It was predictable.

My last visit to Bangkok was some 5 to 6 years ago. A couple weeks ago, some friends and I got it into our heads that we needed to go - I believe it started over a lament on how hard it is to find good Thai food in Singapore. We didn't have too much time to think about it. We found cheap flights. We picked a neighbourhood on Airbnb (Thong Lo). And figured things out from there.

My trip centered around one thing: food. And so this post is mostly a quick and dirty guide how to to fill your stomachs if you have 72 hours in Bangkok.

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I wanted to eat at at least one amazing "zi char"-style place, and found this by Googling. In Singapore, zi char refers to Chinese family-style dining, comprising dishes eaten with rice, and often seafood-heavy. Apart from not being Chinese, this place was essentially it. Because it was featured on a popular food blog about eating in Bangkok, Soei gets its fair share of tourists and it has an English-language menu with the dishes usually featured in write-ups about the place. It would have been fun to go with a Thai friend since the Thai-speaking staff aren't especially helpful if you want to order outside of this menu, but we ordered almost everything on it and I can't say we suffered for it.

The standouts for me were the tom yum mackerel soup (deceptively clear-looking, searingly spicy), the fried mackerel heads (so popular every table only gets one order), and the mackerel curry (yes there is a pattern here).

I love mackerel because it's such a feature of the home-cooking I grew up eating. It is "fishy" and flaky and not for everyone, but it does lend itself to a wide variety of cooking styles. Soei is clearly an expert at preparing mackerel because whether cooked in fiery tom yum soup, deep fried, or stewed in coconut curry, the fish was always tender yet firm, and the fishy oils a nice, sweet foil to the spices. I loved that they used fish with the mackerel roe still intact for the soup and the curry - that extra kick tasting of the sea did it for me.

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I also liked a grilled prawn dish that was dressed with chilli, garlic, sweet onions, shallots, basil and probably other things I couldn't identify -

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From left, clams cooked in a spicy sweet sauce and basil, and grilled river prawns 

I wasn't so impressed by their raw prawn salad (goong chae nam pla, below) - usually its dressed in chilli, garlic and lime juice bit at Soei they add wasabi to the mix. It's still yummy, but it overpowers the natural sweetness of the raw prawns more than I would like -

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This was a nice counterpoint to the strong flavours, like a very eggy and garlicky pad thai but cooked with glass noodles -

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Eat it all with rice and wash it down with beer. Finish your meal with some shaved ice in drizzled with palm sugar and something that looked like frog spawn but were some kind of seeds. Sit back, and enjoy the trains rumbling by.

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Soei:
Kamphaeng Phet 5, Samsen Nai, Phaya Thai (right next to Sam Sen railway station)
Dress casual - it gets pretty hot, both because of the location and the food

Paste
On the other end of the spectrum, we wanted to give the "modern Thai" movement a try, and so we landed on Paste. I was a little nervous because modern takes on Asian cuisines have always been more miss than hit for me. But Paste, thank goodness, was outstanding. Thai food is a complex mix of flavours and it's pretty for one thing to overpower everything else. But the dishes were beautifully "layered" - every bite was a delight because you're experiencing a riot of flavours but they go together wonderfully. For example, the mud crab curry (curry with black pepper, pennywort, samphire and hummingbird flowers) was piquant, sweet, smoky and delicate at the same time.

And this isn't one of those places where you're expected to be wowed by flavour and presentation alone. Fine dining places usually leave me hungry (I'm a comfort food girl at heart) but the food at Paste is substantial and satisfying. Even the rice was a delight - jasmine rice isn't exactly a rarity, but the rice they served was wonderfully aromatic and cooked to a perfect texture.

The menu is a little overwhelming because of the sheer number of choices, and I think this place would be more fun if there were at least 3 to 4 people, so that you could try more things. For 4 people, you could skip the starters (which were good but not the highlight for me) and just order a bunch of "mains" to share and eat with rice. Something like 5 mains would be enough, I reckon, as the food is rich and it fills you up quite a bit even though the portions look manageable.

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Paste
3rd Floor, Gaysorn Plaza, 999 Ploenchit Rd., Lumpini, Bangkok (if you are taking the BTS, stop at Chit Lom)

Dressy, but not formal 

Som Tam Nua
Considering that it's smack in the middle of Siam Square and provides menus in English, you might be a little wary that the food here might be too tourist-friendly and lacking the powerful kick of Thai cuisine. But fear not, the food is consistently good (I don't find it toned down at all and I've had some very spicy things in Thailand), well-priced and an excellent option for the location.

Som Tam refers to the ubiquitous papaya salad, but don't limit to yourself to that. They do a nice version of larb pla tod, which is basically a fried whole fish topped with red onions, chillies, herbs and dressed with lime juice and fish sauce and dried chilli flakes and things I can't quite identify.

Staff are brusque and don't entertain questions much but I live in Singapore where this is considered normal, so I'm not too bothered, especially since the menu is easy to figure out.

Som Tam Nua:
392/14 Siam Square Soi 5
Casual, good for a quick bite

Tep Bar
Tep Bar is a beautiful space in the Charoenkrung with a range of cocktails made with local liquors, which were nice, but I prefer my drinks stronger. The food was actually pretty good and reasonably priced, and the place has a nice buzzy atmosphere that isn't too loud, with great service. It's located on beautifully crumbling street - the tall, shophouses are elegant and beg to be restored to its glory days.

We found time to check out another bar called Teens of Thailand - just steps away from Tep - which claims to be the first real gin bar in Bangkok. The drinks have a good flavour, but again, I just like mine with more kick. It's a noiser, more casual spot - fun if you find a place to sit (it's tiny), less so if you have to stand because it's just awkwardly configured. Again, great, friendly service.

Tep Bar:
Room 69-71, Soi Nana, Charoen Krung Road (if taking a cab, tell the driver it's in Charoenkrung or near Yaowarat) 

Casual, but style-conscious

Teens of Thailand:
76, Soi Nana, Charoen Krung Road

Casual 

Street food
I'm fairly casual where street food is concerned - I don't try to find the most famous places or the "best" because I think that rather defeats the point of something that's meant to be eaten on the go and delicious in an "everyday" way.

The great thing about Airbnb is that if you pick a residential area to stay in, you'll have no lack of street stalls to pick from. I had stewed pork noodles, mini crepes topped with coconut cream and palm sugar, green mangoes (eaten when it's relatively unripe and shockingly tart), all at unassumingly stalls scattered throughout my street (Sukhimvit Soi 55). I had some very nice fried squid eggs from a stall near the Thong Lo BTS station. I had a whole fish baked in salt from a stall in Ekkamai.

They might not be the best of the best, but they were very good, and 100 per cent satisfying. Street food just isn't fun when you overthink it.

Getting around:
Take the BTS or MRT whenever possible, to spare yourself the pain of being stuck in 40-minute jams (for 10-min distances), even though taxis are plentiful and cheap. Around the train stations there are always, taxis, or guys in orange vests riding scooters, who will bring you to nearby destinations in a jiffy. Very reliable and quite fun! Doing this lets you stay in Airbnbs in residential neighbourhoods without worrying about getting around (it's easy to flag one down or get the guards at the condo to call one for you).

But do take a metered taxi from and to the airport - it doesn't cost much at all

Stay:
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I use Airbnb a lot when I travel and so far it's been more of a hit than a miss - find the right place and you feel like a local, living in a neighbourhood full of things you might not seek out as a tourist.

Thong Lo (sometimes spelt Thonglor) is a gentrifying neighbourhood, full of old nondescript buildings transformed into stunningly refurnished clusters of cool cafes and shops, like The Commons - go to the "market" in the basement and grab a bite from the Soul Food Mahanakorn stall, which does a comfort food take on Thai food (they have a full fledge restaurant in Thong Lo itself). I was also impressed with the craft beers on tap from The Beer Cap (and I am extremely sceptical of any place that touts craft beer generally because it's usually a letdown), and the bar staff were extremely friendly and helpful (they let you try all the beers in shot glasses to help you decide).

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The Commons

We also liked having a relaxed, fun bar like the Iron Fairies within walking distance, and we had a rather good, affordable meal at a restaurant called Suppaniga Eating Room (I found out later it has pretty mixed reviews on TA, but I liked it). Again, it does a "modern take on Thai food (from the Isaan) region and I like that you get to try dishes that aren't so easy to find if you're new to Thailand.

But the area is still homely with plenty of street food options for quick bites (as I described above). It's also relatively close to the city centre but far away enough to feel relaxed.

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The Commons:
335 Soi Thonglor 17
Klongton Nue, Wattana
Casual 

Suppaniga:
160/11 Soi Sukhumvit 55 (Thonglor)
Klongton Nuea, Watthana
Casual 

Iron Fairies:
394 Thonglor Road, Sukhumvit 55
Casual 

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

forwards and backwards

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Ever since I bought a simple midi-length dress with a skirt that billows two years ago, I've been quite in love with the ease and elegance that comes with a long-ish, full-ish skirt, especially when pockets are involved. A full skirt is more comfortable than a pencil skirt, and the midi-length is practical as you're unlikely to flash anyone. It's retro in silhouette but modern in spirit.

Watching Tilda Swinton in A Bigger Splash gave me the same vibes. The 1950s roots of the costumes are obvious but there's nothing dated about them; they have a rumpled, laidback ease. There are subtle, sculptural details in the tailoring - literally classics with a twist - but it doesn't feel forced. It's Grace Kelly loosened up with edge.

It's been super warm, making it very tempting to spend my days lounging around in shorts and loose tank tops. But A Bigger Splash is inspiring me to seek a little elegance in the everyday.

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Photos: Paris Vogue

Monday, May 02, 2016

it's personal

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Late last year or early this year (I can't remember), I began reminding myself to take a picture of my outfit every day, with a vague idea that they would somehow coalesce into a coherent post.

Blogging has come a long way since I created my Blogspot account a decade ago. I blogged because I loved suddenly discovering a community of people who loved the power of clothing and fashion the way I did - people who took grainy pictures in front of their dusty mirrors and messy rooms and shared them just because. I grew up reading fashion magazines but had no one to share my awe for my fashion idols Calvin Klein and Helmut Lang - and certainly no one understood why I was so enamoured of the style of Carolyn Bessette Kennedy. Discovering certain Livejournal pages and threads on TFS brought a previously silent world to life. I blogged because I was excited to be part of this space.

From this era of bloggers, stars emerged (of them, Susie Bubble remains the most prominent and happily, true to herself), though it was nothing like what followed. Until 2010, 2011, I could look forward original and thoughtful posts on Dreamecho, Style...A Work in Progress, Nonsense in Stilettos, Childhood Flames, Le Portillon, No Signposts in the Sea, Discotheque Confusion (she's still blogging!), Capture the Castle, Bakerby, just to name a few. Their blogs had less to do with a covetable or trendy aesthetic, and more to do with the fact that style was truly a part of their personal narrative, a means of expression. I got the feeling from their outfit posts that they didn't dress well to be admired, they dressed well because they admire a well-dressed self, whatever that might be.

The professional-looking style blogs we see today come from a very different place - less fangirl, more businesswoman. They don't interest me that much though. I prefer straightforward expressions of personal style - real clothes worn by real people who understand the power of fashion (like The Chic Pragmatist, or Pret a Porter P).

Many of the bloggers I mentioned above have stopped blogging - it is hard to blog if you are holding down a full-time job or full-time studies, so it doesn't surprise me that people have moved on. It was always personal after all.

I look at these photos of myself and I think about how sometimes people think there's nothing "blog-worthy" about what they wear. This is nonsense. Life is not a magazine shoot. Style doesn't only belong in magazines. I've chosen clothing as one way of communicating to the world who I am,  and why wouldn't I post a picture of what I'm already wearing out in the real world, for all to see?

I think style blogs have a bit of a bad rep now - stimulating the appetite to shop is one key criticism. I think it's sad that the desire to dress well is often conflated with the need to acquire more, more more. I'm not sure how to undo that association, or whether it is even possible. But I do know that I continue to admire great style, and I continue to care about how I dress, and that is always going to be part of the narrative on this blog. You put it out there, because it's your point of view, and it doesn't matter what anyone else makes of it.

Friday, April 15, 2016

for the love of the rigid

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Archana of To Universe, With Love, asked about my Nudie jeans, and well, there's nothing I love more than waxing lyrical about denim, so hope this is useful to anyone considering Nudie denims.

First up, I firmly believe all denim shopping is best done when you can try them on physically, and buying them online is a risk, unless you're shopping on a website with excellent return and exchange policies.

In the case of Nudies, shopping in person is especially advisable in my experience - the "right" size on me varies widely between cuts, or even between different fabrics in the same cut. Till now, I'm not entirely sure if Nudies are even designed with women in mind - when I bought my first pair in Amsterdam years ago (in 2007), they were billed to me as "unisex", but since I was in a store that sold only men's jeans, I think they were, and probably still are, made with men in mind. On their website, all the styles are modelled by men. There are some websites that model them on women, and these are usually the skinniest styles (like the Skinny Lin) in the fabrics that contain stretch.

This makes buying Nudies somewhat tricky where sizing is concerned. I'm usually a 30 in women's sizes, but in my preferred Nudie styles, I'm a 31 if it's raw denim. Maybe it's because I have fuller hips and thighs, and men's styles usually have narrower hips.

My current pair of Nudies are in the Grim Tim style, in dry selvedge denim - zero stretch - with a button fly. It has a mid-rise, sitting about an inch below my belly button. These ones are size 31, with a 32-inch inseam (as labelled) and the rise measures about 10 inches (see pix to see where I measured). They have been prewashed (sanforised) so there was unlikely to be significant shrinkage.

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They are more than two years old (my first pair went missing). On men, they look slim and straight. On me, they sit around my hips, thighs and calves fairly tightly, like skinny jeans, but from the widest part of the calf down, they're straight through the ankle.

Here's a picture of the full length. I'm about 1.79m, and the hem hits just below my ankle bone.

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In my experience, stiff denim like this doesn't break down that quickly unless you wear them every single day, and like, ride a motorcycle or something. If you wear them on average once a week, and the most extreme thing you do is to kneel down to tie your shoe laces, as I do, they're not going to fade that much in the first year.

In my case, the wash has faded evenly and it it still looks pretty dark overall (though a tad darker in these pictures than in real life) because due to an unfortunate food spill situation, I had to wash them about two months after I bought them. When you wash them that quickly after you buy them, the indigo will bleed out more evenly, and the natural whiskering and fading you're hoping for won't happen till much, much later. So if the worn-in effect is what you're after, don't wash them until at least 6 months after you buy them, and wear them daily.

Speaking of bleeding out, raw denim can wreak serious denim transfer havoc, so beware if you're wearing or carrying anything light coloured. If you're wondering whether it has stopped bleeding, take a piece of white paper and rub it against your jeans to find out.

Fit-wise, these do start to mould themselves to your shape within days of wear, but they do not stretch a whole size bigger with time. My jeans have stayed pretty much the same size as when I bought them, and since that first wash, I've washed them about every eight months to a year - when you live in the sweaty, humid tropics, you just can't go too long without washing your jeans as advised by hardcore lovers of dry denim.

I'd always thought that technically, dry or raw denim means they haven't been sanforised, and they might shrink a bit the first time you wash them, but I've also seen terms like "raw sanforised denim" so I'm a bit fuzzy about the term - best to simply ask when you're buying. My jeans, (which are sanforised) felt a bit snug after my first wash, but not to the extent that I couldn't button them all the way up, and they pretty much relaxed as fit and they originally did after 10 minutes of wear.

I've read that shrinkage differs from fabric to fabric, and I've also read about people sitting in a tub while wearing their jeans when they wash them the first time, so that it fits properly after shrinking. I think this is overkill - unless you bought them incredibly tight, it's not going to shrink so much that you can't get them on or wear them comfortably, and the nature of denim is to loosen up over time as you keep wearing and washing them.

My advice when buying dry Nudies is buy the one that fits best in the store, and don't size down for fear of stretching. A close fit may be what you're after, but what's important is that you can sit, squat, and bend over comfortably. It's important to understand that raw, zero-stretch denim will never look or feel like your favourite skinny jeans. If your heart is with skinny jeans, stick to something with a bit of stretch. 100% raw denim is stiff and needs a lot of wearing to soften.

So why buy raw denim at all? Personally, I love non-stretch denim - whether they're raw or pre-distressed, they have wonderfully rugged texture and heft, almost like wood grain. It's what makes denim special as a material.

I have noticed that unstretchy denim is more common in dark washes these days.  I've long preferred lighter, broken-in washes, but then I became aware of the environmental damage from producing pre-distressed jeans, and it seemed safer to seek out dark, less "processed" models. (You can also go vintage, as I recently did, but more about that in a separate post.)

While I do own jeans with some stretch, they're exceptions. Denim that is too stretchy and tight has this way of outlining everything - including the shape of my kneecaps - that I hate, and they also flatten my bum. They also have this weird sheen and smoothness to them, which takes the joy out of denim for me.

Not everyone will love Nudies - the back pocket placement, for one, is more flattering on men, although the upside is that they're properly deep and spacious like REAL pockets, as opposed to the decorative nonsense you usually get on women's jeans. Getting the right fit is also a hassle - my friend is a fan of the Tight Long Johns, as are many women, but they look terrible on me.

The best way to tell whether dry, zero-stretch denim is for you is to go to a store and touch and try everything. That's what I did, although when it came down to buying, I bought them online, because it was cheaper. The best prices I've found for Nudie are on Mr Porter, and before I ordered I made sure I noted every detail of the style I wanted when I tried it in the store. Mr Porter also has a decent exchange and return policy that I can vouch for through personal experience, and that's important when you're buying something like jeans.

You can read all about Nudies as a brand here. When I first started buying Nudie jeans, they were all made in Italy, and so is my current pair. More recently, they have outsourced more of their production to India, mainly for other none-denim items in their line like their shirting.

Are there brands other than Nudies to consider? Sadly, most premium denim labels making dry denim are making them for men, and 90% of "raw" styles for women contain stretch, so if you're firmly committed to zero stretch, the options are limited. I've wondered why this is so - the argument is that demand from women is low, but maybe this wouldn't be the case if there were more flattering zero-stretch styles that suit more body types.

Nudie and A.P.C. are the most accessible where raw denim is concerned, because they have a reasonably large number of stockists, and I find Nudie more accessibly priced and more varied in choices. Brands like Imogen + Willie or Tellason carry maybe one style in rigid denim that contains no stretch. But unlike A.P.C. and Nudie, these brands make it a point to tell you precisely which mill and their denim comes from (Cone Mills seem to be the mill of choice).

I like the look of 3sixteen jeans and they carry four styles in a variety of fabrics, which might fit some women. But I'm unlikely to order expensive jeans via pricey international shipping with no certainty on how they fit, and in any case, I have no need for new raws. They also have a collaboration with Self Edge that includes women's styles - with a bit of stretch.

I should stress there is nothing wrong with stretch denim. You will still get nice fades over time - I did with an ancient pair of H&M skinnies. Plus, you can wear them on long plane rides and not want to slit your wrists. But rigid, unstretchy denim has a different attitude altogether, and so long as you don't go out there and buy the tightest pair you can squeeze in, they're perfectly comfortable.

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Saturday, February 27, 2016

effective style

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Photographs: @apc_paris on Instagram

I'm not a big A.P.C. fan, although I admire their things once in a while. But I thought this bit in a piece by Jon Caramanica in NYT (which was actually about WANT Les Essentiels de la vie) summed up the low-key cool of the brand very nicely:

"The clothes encode confidence with only the tiniest of gestures. With a trained eye, you can spot them in the wild, and know that the people savvy enough to wear them have a special kind of zip hiding underneath.This is an admirable place for a brand to be, or to aim for: a mainstream look for non-mainstream people. We — all of us — like to look … effective, and with minimal effort. And there are precious few fashion-minded brands that have that built into their DNA: A.P.C., Unis, Uniqlo on the masstige side, smaller outfits like Harmony."

(In a nice coincidence, he also mentioned Uniqlo, which I am also a fan of, in the same breath.)

On the A.P.C. Instagram account are posts of what their staff around the world wear in the shops, and they are living examples of the vibe Jon Caramanica describes. No doubt they dress knowing they're representing the brand. But being people who spend long hours on their feet for their job, their outfits are also practical and sensible, without sacrificing style. I can get behind that.